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  • Sponsors | -scdaami-

    Thank You Sponsors

  • News and Media Archive | -scdaami-

    An archive of news and media from SCDAA-MI news archive World Sickle Cell Day On Wednesday, June 19, GBT hosted guest speaker Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney, the CEO and Medical Director of the Michigan chapter of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America (SCDAA), as part of its World Sickle Cell Day (WSCD) activities. As part of GBT's support, employees were encouraged to wear their “Hope” T-shirts provided by GBT and designed by artist and SCD activist, Hertz Nazaire. Blood Drive Pictured Michelle Huckaby, SCDAAMI Community Health Worker, Kristal Cobb, SCDAAMI Administrative Assistant, Heather and Tracey Moorehead, Board Members, Anastasia Worthy, SCDAAMI Youth Ambassador and Kym Worthy, SCDAAMI Board Chair. Myths about Sickle Cell ​ Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney, CEO and Medical Director of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America – Michigan Chapter and former SCDAA-MI board member Amyre Makupson discuss myths surrounding sickle cell and facts of the disease .

  • About Us Overview | -scdaami-

    about us The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter has been a leader in the sickle cell community since 1971. We are committed to improving the lives of people with sickle cell by keeping our mission at the center of everything we do. ​ OUR HISTORY SICKLE CELL CENTER Our success all started with the vision of Dr. Charles F. Whitten. His daughter Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney continues the work. Read More > OUR IMPACT EVERYBODY COUNTS Numbers, numbers, numbers. But here at SCDAA-MI, every statistic represents a real person we fight for every day. Read More > OUR BOARD LEADERSHIP MATTERS Our board members provide mission and operational oversight with passion, dedication, and expertise. Read More > OUR STAFF 200 YEARS The SCDAA-MI staff brings more than 200 years of experience to its mission of changing the world of sickle cell. Read More >

  • Sickle Cell Disease | -scdaami-

    sickle cell disease Living with sickle cell disease isn't easy, but proper knowledge about the condition will help patients live a longer, healthier life and guide trait carriers in making educated child-bearing decisions. Symptoms & Complications Sickle cell trait A history of sickle cell What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell is an inherited blood disorder in which the red blood cells change their shape. It is a genetic abnormality and is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S or sickle hemoglobin. Normal red blood cells have a disc-like shape, but in patients of sickle cell disease, they take on a crescent or sickle shape. Normal blood cells carry oxygen to the body, but altered cells cannot move easily through your blood vessels, which affects the oxygen supply. These altered cells cannot carry oxygen properly because when they release oxygen, it sticks together and changes the shape of the red blood cell. ​ ​ Prevalence of Sickle Cell Disease Sickle cell has existed for thousands of years and millions of people around the world suffer from the disease, but it's more common in people with an African bloodline. It is also quite common in people whose ancestors come from the Arabian Peninsula; Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy; Central America; Spanish-speaking regions in South America; and parts of the Caribbean. As a whole, it affects approximately 100,000 Americans and is the most common heritable blood disorder in the U.S. ​ ​ How Do You Inherit Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is not contagious – you're born with it. A child may have this disease when he/she inherits one hemoglobin S gene from each parent. About 1 in every 365 African American babies are born with sickle cell each year and. While the disease primarily affects African Americans and people of color - including individuals of Hispanic and Middle Eastern descent, anyone can inherit sickle cell if the genetics are in place. There are also other sickle cell mutations, including Hemoglobin SC disease and hemoglobin Sβ thalassemia, the two most common. Sickle Cell Trait If you inherit only one sickle hemoglobin gene from a parent you will carry the sickle cell trait. While the trait was once thought to be innocuous, in recent years more has been learned about carriers. People with the trait are more likely to suffer from conditions such as urinary tract infections or blood in the urine. Even athletes with sickle cell trait are now advised to take special precautions with their health. Learn more about sickle cell trait Artwork copyright Ebony.com . Explore More In-Depth Information American Society of Hematology ASH Centers for Disease Control CDC National Institutes of Health NIH Back to the top Sickle Cell Disease: Milestones in Research and Clinical Progress (REVISED September 2018) - download here A History of Sickle Cell Download the PDF here Back to the top

  • 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Walk | -scdaami-

    Donate/Join/Fundraise Since the Walk is now virtual, registration is optional. You can turn your registration fee into a donation, join/create a team or become a fundraiser. Team Set Up Once you create a team, you'll get an email for page set up. We also have step-by-step instructions here to personalize your page. Sponsor Info Your company sponsorship heightens the visibility of your commitment to social responsibility. The return on investment benefits us all. Vendor/Exhibitor This year we're offering two vendor experiences: Both provide virtual promotion, one also offers limited sponsor benefits. Legacy Warriors Are you a sickle cell warrior who's 40 or older? We invite you to join our Legacy Salute! Sign up here by 9/5 to be included. Click here to join in the virtual walk program on Sept. 19th Our 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Walk will still raise consciousness around the most common genetic disorder in the U.S. But this year it'll happen from wherever you are. More than just an awareness event, we join efforts to raise funds, promote the need for additional research, and combat medical inequities often faced by sickle cell patients. ​ We still need your support. Register, donate, sign up to fundraise, or start a team today ! ​​ How our virtual walk works Learn More Contests & Prizes Learn More Tribute to Fallen Warriors Learn More Salute to Legacy Warriors Learn More #WarriorsWipeItDown Challenge Learn More #SickleSlide Learn More Virtual Walk Day Agenda Join us Saturday, Sept. 19 on our Facebook page @sicklecellmichigan for a morning filled with celebration beginning at 10 a.m. (Lineup subject to change) ​ Welcome remarks #WarriorsWipeItDown & #SickleSlide Tribute to Fallen Warriors 2020 Graduation Virtual Open House Salute to Legacy Warriors Sponsor Showcase – GBT, Novartis, Medunik USA Vendor Slideshow Award presentations Let’s Move! Lead volunteers & key supporters Deborah Smith Pollard Honorary Walk Chair Deborah Smith Pollard , is co-host of "Sunday Morning Inspiration" on MIX 92.3 FM and Professor of English Literature at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Read More Dr. Ahmar Zaidi Honorary Walk Co-Chair "Dr. Z," Ahma Zaidi is a Pediatric Oncologist/Hematologist, in the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic at Children’s Hospital of Michigan, and nationally known SCD advocate. Read More You Sponsors & Vendors Your company helps take our walk from good to great and enables us to changes lives and create possibilities - especially in times like these. Read More 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Walk Sponsors Diamond Presenting Sponsor Silver Sponsors Copper Sponsor Pfizer Functional Fluidics Check our leaderboard frequently to see how your campaign is doing and what the competition is up to. For additional information, please contact the following SCDAA-MI staff for specific assistance or call (313) 864-4406: Registration or team setup - email Kristal Johnson Sponsorships - email Stefanie Worth Vendor Information - email Tracie Conic

  • SickleCell911 | -scdaami-

    SICKLE CELL 911: FAST ACCESS TO GUIDELINES & BETTER CARE Empowering medical professionals to implement evidence-based sickle cell action. Amplifying the patient's voice in care. " Only about 1 in 4 patients with sickle cell disease receive the standard of care described in current guidelines, and many studies have shown that patients do not receive treatment for their pain as soon as, or in appropriate doses as, other patients." - HHS Office of Minority Health PROVIDER INFO SCDAA HEALTH ALERT - COVID-19 AND SICKLE CELL DISEASE: An Outline to Decrease Burden and Minimize Morbidity PARTNER WITH SAFER COVID REGISTRY ASH COVID FAQs OPIOIDS & SCD NIH GUIDELINES COMPLICATIONS ASH POCKET GUIDES ABOUT SAFE(R) SCD EDUCATION IF A PATIENT GIVES YOU THIS CARD, PLEASE CLICK THE IMAGE FOR NIH GUIDELINES! PLEASE TRIAGE AS ESI 2 PER NIH AND AHRQ "It is not possible to manage pain at triage for patients with renal colic, cancer, or sickle cell crisis. These patients should be triaged as ESI level 2 and rapid placement should be facilitated whenever possible." - AHRQ, Emergency Severity Index (ESI) Implementation Handbook (see page 26) Web site PDF NIH SICKLE CELL PAIN ALGORITHM HOW TO CONDUCT A SICKLE CELL ASSESSMENT These videos from Duke University's School of Nursing demonstrate how to conduct an assessment for a sickle cell patient's vaso-occlusive crisis (6 mins) and a patient with a high number of ED visits who might face perceptions of opioid addiction or drug-seeking behavior (3 mins). ABOUT THE SAFE(R) INITIATIVE SAFE(R) stems from the sad and dangerous reality that many individuals with sickle cell opt to "wait out" an acute episode as long as possible rather than endure a traumatizing trip to the ED where they're likely to be stigmatized and/or undertreated. This treatment time lost equates to eventual organ failure or other tragic complications. We're asking the medical community to partner with us in assuring patients that they'll be SAFE(R) in your facility because you'll adhere to CDC and NIH guidelines in their care. ​ Access/download a compilation of NIH guides specific to SAFE(R). ​ Printable patient SCD911 SAFE(R) Card . ​ Learn more about the SAFE(R) Initiative . CDC CLARIFICATION ON OPIOIDS FOR SCD Read the clarification letter from CDC to ASH online . ​ Read the CDC's statement against misapplication of the guideline here. BACK TO THE TOP NIH EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE NIH full recommendations Click the image at left for a PDF of the full 161-page NIH recommendations. This link will take you directly to the full document at NIH's site. NIH Quick Guide to Recommendations "The purpose of this Guide to Recommendations is to provide clinicians with a digital resource of the treatment recommendations extracted from the full report. For more information, please refer to the full report. . . ." ​ Click the image at right for a pdf of the 48-page Quick Guide. This link will take you directly to the Quick Guide document at NIH's site. NIH GUIDELINES: ACUTE CARE BREAKOUT For ease-of-access, this section contains a breakout of individual acute complications of sickle cell with links to corresponding PDFs from the Quick Guide and the full recommendations. What does the patient report? Remember, there are no labs that can indicate or confirm a patient's level of pain ! Acute Chest Syndrome: Quick Full ​ Acute Stroke: Quick Full ​ Anemia: Quick Full ​ Fever: Quick Full ​ Hepatobiliary: Quick Full ​ Multi-System Organ Failure: Quick Full ​ Ocular Conditions: Quick Full ​ Priapism: Quick Full ​ Renal Failure: Quick Full ​ Splenic Sequestration: Quick Full ​ Vaso-occlusive crisis/pain episode: Quick Full ​ ASH POCKET GUIDES FOR ACUTE AND NON-ACUTE CARE MANAGEMENT ASH POCKET GUIDE - MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE COMPLICATIONS OF SICKLE CELL Click the image to access a PDF of ASH's Management of Acute Complications of Sickle Cell Disease pocket guide. Presented by ASH in 2014, adapted from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Evidence Based Management of Sickle Cell Disease: Expert Panel Report, 2014. (Click here to go directly to ASH's web site for links to all its sickle cell pocket guides.) ACCESS ALL ASH POCKET GUIDES FOR MANAGING SICKLE CELL Click here to go directly to ASH's web site for links to all the sickle cell pocket guides. The following links will take you to individual PDFs for download. Cardiopulmonary and Kidney Disease in Sickle Cell Disease: Screening and Management This pocket guide includes key recommendations from the American Society of Hematology 2019 guidelines for sickle cell disease: cardiopulmonary and kidney disease, available soon in Blood Advances. ​ Health Maintenance and Management of Chronic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease Presented by ASH in 2014, adapted from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Evidence Based Management of Sickle Cell Disease: Expert Panel Report, 2014 ​ Hydroxyurea and Transfusion Therapy for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease Presented by ASH in 2014, adapted from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Evidence Based Management of Sickle Cell Disease: Expert Panel Report, 2014 ​ Download the apps: For iOS For Android Web version of the apps BACK TO THE TOP SOURCES: https://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov/sicklecell/, https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/evidence-based-management-sickle-cell-disease, https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/sites/default/files/media/docs/Evd-Bsd_SickleCellDis_Rep2014.pdf, https://www.hematology.org/Clinicians/Guidelines-Quality/Quick-Reference.aspx, https://sickleemergency.duke.edu/educational-resources/videos, https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/wysiwyg/professionals/systems/hospital/esi/esihandbk.pdf

  • SCD Transition | -scdaami-

    SCDtranstion support We want to make it easier to find credible, useful information that helps make it a little easier to live with sickle cell. Ideas for content are welcome! CLINICAL TRIALS Research into treatments for sickle cell are at an all-time high. Once a new possibility is discovered, it moves through a series of further studies and approvals that include clinical trials. Without the brave patients who come forward to test new approaches, new treatments couldn't make it to market. Here's a list of NIH-funded trials for sickle cell currently underway. Source: National Institutes of Health SICKLE CELL GLOSSARY A diagnosis of sickle cell comes with its own language. If you're newly-diagnosed, the words can be overwhelming. As research evolves and new discoveries about living with the disease come to light, new terms will be added to conversations. This glossary will serve as both an introduction and a refresher for those who need it. Source: Missouri Dept. of Health & Senior Services UNDERSTANDING MEDICAL SPEAK Do you know what your doctor just said to you? Even if you ask for clarification on site, you might forget a few things before you reach your next destination. Or you may be surfing the internet and come across unfamiliar terms used in your medical care. This dictionary provides definitions in every day language to help you better understand your condition. Source: Medical Library Association NIH - HEALTH MAINTENANCE FOR SCD Click the image for a PDF of the NIH guidelines and recommendations for the health maintenance of people with sickle cell. (Approx. 40 pages) Read and provide a copy to your primary care physician. Click the yellow button to go directly to the full NIH document. Source: National Institutes of Health CDC OPIOID CLARIFICATION FOR SCD In February 2019, the CDC clarified its opioid guidelines in a letter to ASH stating its guidelines were not intended to manage the complexities of sickle cell. The CDC instead refers providers to the NIH guidelines for proper care. Access the full letter. Source: American Society of Hematology NIH - TREATMENT GUIDES FOR SCD Click the image for a PDF of the full NIH guidelines and recommendations for the management of sickle cell disease (161 pages). Click the yellow button to go directly to the full document on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) web site. Source: National Institutes of Health PASSPORT TO HEALTH TOOLKIT Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney's Passport to Health Toolkit is a great source of information for maintaining your health. (Join us for an educational program to receive the backpack that goes with it. *While supplies last!) Source: Dr. Wanda Shurney TIPS FOR TRIPS TO ER Emergency room visits are a frequent course of action for people with sickle cell. The CDC provides this handout with suggestions for talking with physicians and navigating the experience. Source: Centers for Disease Control SICKLE CELL FACTS & FIGURES The American Society of Hematology (ASH) provides this clear and thorough handout with facts and figures to help educate yourself and others about the biology and impact of sickle cell disease. Source: American Sociiety of Hematology Looking for a hematologist? Try this zip code-based search . (We do not endorse the physicians listed. Use proper care in researching their expertise.) You can also contact our office for suggestions provided by existing patients/clients. Other informational resources

  • Vendor Payment Confirmation | -scdaami-

    Vendor Payment Confirmation Donate/Join/Fundraise Since the Walk is now virtual, registration is optional. You can turn your registration fee into a donation, join/create a team or become a fundraiser. Team Set Up Once you create a team, you'll get an email for page set up. We also have step-by-step instructions here to personalize your page. Sponsor Info Your company sponsorship heightens the visibility of your commitment to social responsibility. The return on investment benefits us all. Vendor/Exhibitor This year we're offering two vendor experiences: Both provide virtual promotion, one also offers limited sponsor benefits. Legacy Warriors Are you a sickle cell warrior who's 40 or older? We invite you to join our Legacy Salute! Sign up here by 9/5 to be included. Thank you for completing your Vendor/Exhibitor Reservation for our 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Virtual Walk! Your support of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter helps ensure that counseling, educational, medical, and basic needs services are addressed for people with sickle cell. By supporting our work, you help improve lives. ​ Tracie Conic , Director of Client Services at SCDAA-MI, coordinates vendor and exhibitor activities for the Walk and will contact you with further instructions and information. You will receive an electronic payment receipt from PayPal. Please save your receipts. Thank you for your support!

  • 2018 Gallery | -scdaami-

    2018 event gallery 2020 Photo Gallery 2019 Photo Gallery Awareness Campaign Launch 2018 SICKLE CELLebration Boll Family YMCA Detroit Saturday, September, 22, 2018 Out of gallery June 19th - World Sickle Cell Day! Out of gallery Saturday, June 9th, 2018 #Sicklecellmatters Awareness Walk Palmer Park, Detroit, Michigan Out of gallery Friendship Baptist Church presents The 42nd Annual Cynthia Coles Circle Benefit Luncheon Out of gallery

  • SCM Walk Team Set Up | -scdaami-

    How to Set Up Your Walk Team Donate/Join/Fundraise Since the Walk is now virtual, registration is optional. You can turn your registration fee into a donation, join/create a team or become a fundraiser. Team Set Up Once you create a team, you'll get an email for page set up. We also have step-by-step instructions here to personalize your page. Sponsor Info Your company sponsorship heightens the visibility of your commitment to social responsibility. The return on investment benefits us all. Vendor/Exhibitor This year we're offering two vendor experiences: Both provide virtual promotion, one also offers limited sponsor benefits. Legacy Warriors Are you a sickle cell warrior who's 40 or older? We invite you to join our Legacy Salute! Sign up here by 9/5 to be included. The annual Sickle Cell Matters Walk brings us new friends and new donors every year. But, we rely on our current supporters to get the word out and introduce our work to others. This year we’ve set targets of 10 major sponsors, 100 fundraisers/teams and 1,000 participants to help us reach our fundraising goal of $100,000. Here’s how you can help us get there. STEP 1 - Donate or join/create a fundraising team To donate: Click the DONATE button at the top of the page . You can then use the arrow to select a specific team to donate to or donate to the overall walk, choose how much you'd like to donate, and whether it will be a one-time or recurring donation. Follow the prompts from there. To join or create a team: Click the JOIN button at the top of the page . You'll then have the option to join an existing team or start your own team. When you join a team, the system automatically creates a fundraising page for you that you can share with others. If you do not want to create your own fundraising campaign, close the popup box and click the donate button instead. To create your own team, you'll need a team/campaign name, fundraising goal (the default is set at $1,000, but you can change that) and a story about your team. The default story is the one used by the overall Walk campaign. From there, you'll follow the prompts to complete team set up. Registration is now optional. If you choose to register, here are the instructions:​ ​ Click register and follow the self-guided instructions to select your tickets (16 & over ($20), child ($10), and young child (free). Enter your buyer and payment info. You’ll be offered the options to fundraise as a team, fundraise as an individual, or continue without fundraising. If you select fundraise as an individual, you’ll need to enter a campaign name and your goal. If you select fundraise as a team, you can choose to join or create team: Join gives you a list of teams you can choose from. To create a team, you need to enter a campaign name (your team name) and your goal. You’ll then be guided to finalize your purchase. This will complete your registration as a Walk participant and team fundraiser. STEP 2 - Customize Your Team Campaign OPTION 1 - You created your team through your Walk registration or by clicking the Join button. ​ You’ll receive email receipts for your payments and a separate email confirming your team set up. To manage your team, you’ll need to click the Manage Campaign button in the email, which takes you to the GoFundMe Charity web page. Sign up for an account using the email you registered with. You’ll then be able to see the campaign – team – you started. Now you can customize your team page and invite others to join your fundraiser as team members. Add photos and videos, personalize your team’s story, and send customized update emails to your team. Tools for Managing Your Team (You'll need to be logged into your account to view this information.) OPTION 2 - You're trying to return to your team page (1) Go to our Walk campaign page on Charity GoFundMe : (a) If you aren’t already logged in, click the graphic in the upper right hand corner of the page. You’ll get a drop-down menu. Click SIGN IN and enter the email and password you used to create your team campaign. From there, go back to the graphic in the upper right hand corner. Click on CAMPAIGNS in the drop-down menu. OR (b) If you’re already logged in, click the graphic in the upper right hand corner of the page. You’ll get a drop-down menu. Click on CAMPAIGNS in the drop down menu. (2) Your team should appear on the page. Click EDIT. A Team Page box will appear. Click EDIT again. (3) Under the tabs you can do the following: CONTENT: you can add photos, video, your story and your goal. Be sure to click SAVE! DESIGN: You can create your Facebook share post by adding a photo and brief text. Be sure to click SAVE! SETTINGS: Will give you the direct URL for your team (e.g. charity.gofundme.com/cue-the-cure), and decide whether you want to allow people on your team to create their own fundraisers, share your campaign, and more. Be sure to click SAVE! You’ll find additional tools to manage your campaign here . (https://charitysupport.gofundme.com/hc/en-us/articles/360035656131-Tools-for-managing-your-teams- ) STEP 3 - Start Fundraising You’ve set your goal, now how to you reach it? Exceed it? ​ Do you work for a company that sponsors events or activities? Offer them the opportunity to support your team or sponsor the Walk . Invite your friends, family members, social groups, clubs, parents of your child’s friends, co-workers, etc., to join your effort. Do you have a skill you can put to work to help raise money? Something you can do virtually while we’re staying home and staying safe? Hustle lessons, tutoring, voice or music instruction, baking (customers can pay you with CashApp or PayPal and pick up items from your porch when they go out grocery shopping or vice versa). Map out your participant strategy. For a $500 team goal, you could target 35 people at $15 each, 25 people at $20 each; 20 people at $25 each; 15 people at $35; 10 people at $50, 5 $100 donors, or one very generous $500 supporter. More than likely, your team will use a variety of donor amounts to reach its goal. Invite five people to (1) each donate $20 and (2) each invite another five people who’ll donate $20, and so on. Hold a shoe size fundraiser: Email friends and family members to donate the amount of their shoe size to join your team. (If you wear a 10, you donate $10, etc.) Use the built-in links to promote your team's campaign on Facebook and Twitter. Check our leaderboard frequently to see how your campaign is doing and what the competition is up to. For additional information, please contact the following SCDAA-MI staff for specific assistance or call (313) 864-4406: Registration or team setup - email Kristal Johnson Sponsorships - email Stefanie Worth Vendor Information - email Tracie Conic