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  • Our Board | -scdaami-

    Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter ​ Board of Directors Chairperson Kym L. Worthy Prosecutor, Wayne County District ​ Jeffrey Sherbow, Esq, 1st Vice Chair, Attorney, Sherbow Law Office ​ Ms. Cheryl L. Haskett, Treasurer Finance Director & Consultant, YDB, Inc. Kathleen Neumann, Secretary Retired Regional Director, Judson Center ​ Sharada Sarnaik, M.D. , Assistant Secretary Retired Director, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic Children's Hospital of Michigan ​ Sonja L. Banks, CEO, International Dyslexia Association, Inc . Barbara Cushing, M.D. Retired Pediatric Hematologist, CHM LeWanda Gipson Deputy Director, Matrix Human Services ​ Deborah Smith-Pollard, Ph.D. Associate Professor, U of M Dearborn ​ Beverly Watkins Systems Administration, Toyota ​ our board

  • Get Involved Overview | -scdaami-

    get involved Together our tenacity and commitment have greatly brightened the future for sickle cell: comprehensive pediatric care has become a medical standard throughout most of the U.S., allowing patients to pursue college educations, take on dream careers, marry and welcome extended families. At the same time, many challenges remain: awareness among the adult medical community lags behind pediatric expertise at the expense of patient health. Sickle cell still bears the weight of stigma attached to systemic discrimination. While research is on the uptick, treatments are limited. There is no universal cure. ​ Your support matters in our quest for consciousness, equity, and a cure. Please join us today. DONATE The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter thrives on the support of dedicated patients/clients, staff, volunteers, funders, sponsors, donors , and community partners . We've remained committed to our mission of improving the lives of people living with sickle cell disease for 48 years. Give today . ADVOCATE This is an exciting time for the sickle cell community as new treatments have recently become available and interest in research to find a cure has spiked. Yet, insurance hindrances, misplaced opioid restrictions, and ongoing systemic discrimination continue to block access to proper care and threaten the lives of patients. Raise your voice for sickle cell. VOLUNTEER There are always volunteer opportunities at SCDAA-MI for assistance at our annual Sickle Cell Matters Walk, encouraging an increased social media presence, office help, committees, and more. ​ Complete our volunteer form to let us know you're interested, and we'll contact you when opportunities arise.

  • About Us | -scdaami-

    about us The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter has been a leader in the sickle cell community since 1971. We are committed to improving the lives of people with sickle cell by keeping our mission at the center of everything we do. ​ OUR HISTORY SICKLE CELL CENTER Our success all started with the vision of Dr. Charles F. Whitten. His daughter Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney continues the work. Read More > OUR IMPACT EVERYBODY COUNTS Numbers, numbers, numbers. But here at SCDAA-MI, every statistic represents a real person we fight for every day. Read More > OUR BOARD LEADERSHIP MATTERS Our board members provide mission and operational oversight with passion, dedication, and expertise. Read More > OUR STAFF 200 YEARS The SCDAA-MI staff brings more than 200 years of experience to its mission of changing the world of sickle cell. Read More >

  • 2018 Gallery | -scdaami-

    2018 event gallery 2020 Photo Gallery 2019 Photo Gallery Awareness Campaign Launch 2018 SICKLE CELLebration Boll Family YMCA Detroit Saturday, September, 22, 2018 June 19th - World Sickle Cell Day! Saturday, June 9th, 2018 #Sicklecellmatters Awareness Walk Palmer Park, Detroit, Michigan Friendship Baptist Church presents The 42nd Annual Cynthia Coles Circle Benefit Luncheon

  • About Us Overview | -scdaami-

    about us The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter has been a leader in the sickle cell community since 1971. We are committed to improving the lives of people with sickle cell by keeping our mission at the center of everything we do. ​ OUR HISTORY SICKLE CELL CENTER Our success all started with the vision of Dr. Charles F. Whitten. His daughter Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney continues the work. Read More > OUR IMPACT EVERYBODY COUNTS Numbers, numbers, numbers. But here at SCDAA-MI, every statistic represents a real person we fight for every day. Read More > OUR BOARD LEADERSHIP MATTERS Our board members provide mission and operational oversight with passion, dedication, and expertise. Read More > OUR STAFF 200 YEARS The SCDAA-MI staff brings more than 200 years of experience to its mission of changing the world of sickle cell. Read More >

  • Sickle Cell Disease | -scdaami-

    sickle cell disease Living with sickle cell disease isn't easy, but proper knowledge about the condition will help patients live a longer, healthier life and guide trait carriers in making educated child-bearing decisions. Symptoms & Complications Sickle cell trait Top A history of sickle cell What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell is an inherited blood disorder in which the red blood cells change their shape. It is a genetic abnormality and is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S or sickle hemoglobin. Normal red blood cells have a disc-like shape, but in patients of sickle cell disease, they take on a crescent or sickle shape. Normal blood cells carry oxygen to the body, but altered cells cannot move easily through your blood vessels, which affects the oxygen supply. These altered cells cannot carry oxygen properly because when they release oxygen, it sticks together and changes the shape of the red blood cell. ​ ​ Prevalence of Sickle Cell Disease Sickle cell has existed for thousands of years and millions of people around the world suffer from the disease, but it's more common in people with an African bloodline. It is also quite common in people whose ancestors come from the Arabian Peninsula; Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy; Central America; Spanish-speaking regions in South America; and parts of the Caribbean. As a whole, it affects approximately 100,000 Americans and is the most common heritable blood disorder in the U.S. ​ ​ How Do You Inherit Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is not contagious – you're born with it. A child may have this disease when he/she inherits one hemoglobin S gene from each parent. About 1 in every 365 African American babies are born with sickle cell each year and. While the disease primarily affects African Americans and people of color - including individuals of Hispanic and Middle Eastern descent, anyone can inherit sickle cell if the genetics are in place. There are also other sickle cell mutations, including Hemoglobin SC disease and hemoglobin Sβ thalassemia, the two most common. Sickle Cell Trait If you inherit only one sickle hemoglobin gene from a parent you will carry the sickle cell trait. While the trait was once thought to be innocuous, in recent years more has been learned about carriers. People with the trait are more likely to suffer from conditions such as urinary tract infections or blood in the urine. Even athletes with sickle cell trait are now advised to take special precautions with their health. Learn more about sickle cell trait sickle cell trait Artwork copyright Ebony.com . Explore More In-Depth Information American Society of Hematology ASH Centers for Disease Control CDC National Institutes of Health NIH Back to the top Sickle Cell Disease: Milestones in Research and Clinical Progress (REVISED September 2018) - download here History A History of Sickle Cell Download the PDF here Back to the top

  • 2023 SAVE THE DATE | -scdaami-

    Sponsorship Opportunities Here

  • 2020 Walk Day | -scdaami-

    Since we have announced our Save the date for our 2021 Sickle Cell Matters Awareness Walk, We look forward to your participation! Here are highlights from last year's walk..... Enjoy!!!! I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy. The Sickle Cell Matters Virtual Walk program starts at 10 :15 a.m. EST here and on Facebook @SickleCellMichigan! YOUR GUIDE TO THE daY* *Program times are approximate You can still donate to the 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Virtual Walk through September 30th. We appreciate your support! Donate to the cause or a team Click the image to download a PDF version of the day's agenda. 10:15 - WELCOME REMARKS SCDAA-MI CEO & Medical Director, Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney Honorary Chair, Deborah Smith-Pollard Honorary C-Chair, Dr. Ahmar Zaidi, "Dr. Z." ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 10:21 - #SICKLESLIDE Join Dr. Shurney and the staff of the Bottomless Toy Chest in the #SickleSlide ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 10:24 - WARRIOR RECOGNITIONS Tribute to Fallen Warriors - Those We've Lost 2020 Graduation Open House Celebration Salute to Legacy Warriors - Those 40 & Over ​ 10:37 - MEET OUR SPONSORS Greetings from Medunik USA & What You Should Know About Sickle Cell Anemia Wayne County Community College District Tour Emmaus Life Sciences - About Endari ​ 11:14 - PRODUCTS & SERVICES Pfizer - Functional Fluidics Sick Cells - Versiti - Terumo ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 11:16 - GIVEAWAYS & AWARDS 1st & 2nd Place Fundraising Teams (as of 9/12) Most Team Members (as of 9/12) T-Shirt/Poster Design Contest Winner Giveaway Winner From All Participants (as of 9/5 ​ 11:20 - TIME TO MOVE! Now's the time to move how you choose. Take your walk, do a little yoga, or head out to your ballot box to drop off your election ballot. Be sure to post your photos u sing #SickleCellMattersWalkMI #SickleCellMatters #SickleCellLivesMatter ​ Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney Deborah Smith-Pollard Dr. Ahmar Zaidi Thank you for making our 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Virtual Walk a huge success! DONATE NOW Our 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Walk sponsors! Meet the Sponsors

  • SCM Walk Vendor Form | -scdaami-

    2020 Vendor & Exhibitor Form Donate/Join/Fundraise Since the Walk is now virtual, registration is optional. You can turn your registration fee into a donation, join/create a team or become a fundraiser. Team Set Up Once you create a team, you'll get an email for page set up. We also have step-by-step instructions here to personalize your page. Sponsor Info Your company sponsorship heightens the visibility of your commitment to social responsibility. The return on investment benefits us all. Vendor/Exhibitor This year we're offering two vendor experiences: Both provide virtual promotion, one also offers limited sponsor benefits. Legacy Warriors Are you a sickle cell warrior who's 40 or older? We invite you to join our Legacy Salute! Sign up here by 9/5 to be included. Vendor and Exhibitor reservations are accepted on a first come-first served basis. Check or money order reservations must be mailed to be received by our office no later than September 10, 2020. Online reservations using a bank account or credit card can be made on this page up until September 15, 2020. Please make your display selection: $100 - Vendor $500 - Exhibitor Vendor & Exhibitor Form Your support helps us change lives! Company/Organization Contact Name Address City, State Zip Code Email Address Phone Web Site URL and company/product description Service area (check all that apply) Health & Wellness Financial Education Retail Youth Development Beauty & Fashion Other Please indicate your display choice: Exhibitor experience - $125 Vendor experience - $50 Nonprofit supporter - $0 For nonprofit orders, please see instructions. SUBMIT YOUR ORDER Clicking submit will take you to the payment page. Exhibitor: $125 Virtual recognition to promote your business or organization: (1) pre- and (1) post-event social media mention; inclusion in our day-of online vendor presentation with business description and link included in Facebook post; listing on our web site’s Walk sponsor page; (1) business card ad on our web site's "classified" page; (1) business card ad in our fall e-newsletter. ​ Vendor: $50 Virtual recognition to promote your business or organization: inclusion in our day-of online vendor presentation, name listing on our web site's "classified" page; (1) business card ad in our fall e-newsletter. Nonprofit: FREE Virtual recognition to promote your business or organization: name listing on our web site's "classified" page; (1) business card ad in our fall e-newsletter. You must complete your reservation manually and mail (see address below) or email along with a copy of your 501(c)3 IRS Determination Letter. ​ Please note the following: ​ Check or money order reservations must be received in our office by September 10, 2020. ​ Make check or money order payable to SCDAA-MI. Mail to: SCDAA-Michigan, ATTN: Tracie Conic - Walk Vendor, 18516 James Couzens Fwy, Detroit, MI 48235 ​ Online reservations using a bank account or credit card can be made through this page up until September 15, 2020. ​ Questions? Please email Tracie Conic or call (313) 864-4406. Thank you for your support!

  • Treatments | -scdaami-

    sickle cell treatments While there is no universal cure for sickle cell disease (yet), there are several therapeutic approaches to relieve symptoms, reduce complications, and extend life. Early treatment (by eight weeks) by a hematologist is critical for newborns. Beginning a course of prophylactic penicillin at age two months was a historic intervention in changing the course of childhood sickle cell survival. View our Feb. 29th Treatment Workshop where we discussed all the current treatments available to cure sickle cell. CLICK TO PLAY ON FACEBOOK Part 1 with Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney (44 mins) CLICK TO PLAY ON FACEBOOK Part 2 with Dr. Ahmar Zaidi (58 mins) The only cure for sickle cell disease is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Most sickle cell disease transplants are currently performed in children who have had complications such as strokes, acute chest crises, and recurring pain crises. These transplants usually use a matched donor. Blood and bone marrow transplants are riskier in adults. Read more ​ Medicines can reduce or alleviate symptoms and complications and prolong life. Penicillin In children who have sickle cell disease, taking penicillin two times a day has been shown to reduce the chance of having a severe infection caused by the pneumococcus bacteria. Newborns need to take liquid penicillin. Older children can take tablets. ​ Many doctors will stop prescribing penicillin after a child has reached the age of 5. Some prefer to continue this antibiotic throughout life, particularly if a person has hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin Sβ0 thalassemia, since people who have sickle cell disease are still at risk. All people who have had surgical removal of the spleen, called a splenectomy, or a past infection with pneumococcus should keep taking penicillin throughout life. Hydroxyurea Hydroxyurea is an oral medicine that has been shown to reduce or prevent several sickle cell disease complications. This medicine was studied in patients who have sickle cell disease, because it was known to increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin (hemoglobin F) in the blood. Increased hemoglobin F provides some protection against the effects of hemoglobin S. ​ Watch Dr. Shurney’s animated video about Hydroxyurea and how it works Endari Approved by the FDA for sickle cell use in 2017, Endari is an oral L-glutamine therapy for sickle cell disease and sickle cell thalassemia that reduces the acute complications of sickle cell disease in adults and children 5 years and older. It works by increasing the amount of glutamine in the blood. The added glutamine is taken up by the defective sickle cells, and when metabolized (broken down) results in the release of antioxidants.Common side effects include constipation, nausea, headache, abdominal pain, cough, pain in the extremities, back pain and chest pain. Patient web site Endari co-pay assistance Adakveo In 2019, the FDA also approved a new medicine to reduce the number of pain crises experienced by adults and children 16 years and older who have sickle cell disease. The medicine, which is given through an IV in the vein, helps prevent blood cells from sticking to blood vessel walls and causing blood flow blockage, inflammation, and pain crises. Possible side effects include nausea, joint pain, back pain, and fever. Patient resources web site Downloadable patient brochure ​ Oxbryta The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new medicine in 2019 to treat sickle cell disease in adults and children 12 years and older. The oral medicine prevents red blood cells from forming the sickle shape and binding together. This may decrease the destruction of some red blood cells, which in turn lowers the risk for anemia and improves blood flow to your organs. Possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, fatigue, and fever. Rarely, allergic reactions may occur, causing rashes, hives, or mild shortness of breath. Talk to your doctor about other medicines you take. Patient web site Caregiver tips Downloadable patient information leaflet Transfusions are often used in acute or preventive situations. Transfusions are administered to treat and prevent certain sickle cell disease complications. These transfusions may include: Acute transfusion to treat complications that cause severe anemia. Doctors may also use transfusions when a patient has an acute stroke, in many cases of acute chest crises, and in multi-organ failure. A patient who has sickle cell disease usually receives blood transfusions before surgery, to prevent complications. Red blood cell transfusions to increase the number of red blood cells and provide normal red blood cells that are more flexible than red blood cells with sickle hemoglobin. Regular or ongoing blood transfusions for people who have had an acute stroke, to reduce the chances of having another stroke. Doctors also recommend blood transfusions for children who have abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound results, because transfusions can reduce the chance of having a first stroke. ​ There are other treatments for specific complications. Be mindful that not all treatments work for everyone. Some people find success with alternative treatments as well, including medical marijuana (be knowledgeable about legalities that may impact school, work and overall health). To stay as healthy as possible, patients should be sure to get regular medical care that includes a pediatrician (for children) or primary care physician (for adults) and a hematologist and work with them to create the best individual care plan. Patients should also live a healthy lifestyle and avoid triggers that may cause a pain crisis. ​ ​ Page sources: NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, FDA.gov, Endari, Adakveo, Oxbryta ​

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