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  • 2020 Walk Ads | -scdaami-

    2020 Sickle Cell Matters Virtual Walk Sponsor & Vendor Gallery Terumo Vendors: Sick Cells and Versiti Blood Services Thank you to our 2020 Sickle Cell Matters Walk sponsors!

  • 2019 Sickle Cell Matters Annual Walk | -scdaami-

    2019 Sickle Cell Matters Walk Become a Sponsor Become a Vendor

  • News & Multimedia | -scdaami-

    media Keep up with SCDAA-MI news, articles and information from a variety of outlets on issues affecting sickle cell, and videos and webinars to keep you up-to-date about what's happening in the #sicklecell community. ​ SCDAA-MI OUT & ABOUT SCDAA-MI World Sickle Cell Day press release SCDAA-MI ANNOUNCES SAFE(R) INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY SICKLE CELL CARE Effort aims to assist medical community in proper treatment of long-misunderstood disease ​ February 26, 2020 Read more ​ SAFE(R) provides medical professionals with quick access to an online portal at SCDAAMI.org/SickleCell911 that provides clinical practice guidelines for sickle cell established by the National Institutes of Health, sickle cell-specific opioid guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, as well as best practices and recommendations from the American Society of Hematology and other leading experts in sickle cell treatment. NHLBI Speaker "Thank you National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) for having me alongside these devoted advocates as a panelist for the “What is a Meaningful Cure?” panel discussion hosted by Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney . #CureSCI #sicklecell Thanks Teonna Woolford for the pic!! — with Velvet Brown-Watts , André Marcel Harris and Cassandra Trimnell at Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel and Executive Meeting Center ." NEWS FROM AROUND THE COMMUNITY Toledo's Promedica Hospital has added an adult sickle cell clinic, the first of its kind in northwest Toledo. - WATCH & READ Get the clinic's info here Could gene therapy cure sickle cell anemia? - WATCH FDA approves first targeted therapy to treat patients with painful complication of sickle cell disease - READ FDA Approves Oxbryta™ (Voxelotor), the First Medicine Specifically Targeting the Root Cause of Sickle Cell Disease - READ Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Has Oklahoma Roots - READ Patient & caregiver focused videos All Categories Play Video Play Video 10:35 Sickle Cell Disease: a battle for equality, justice and respect | Ahmar Zaidi | TEDxDetroit What led a 46 year old Haitian artist to being kicked out of the hospital in the dead of winter? What led him to joblessness and homelessness? Part of the answer was in his blood...but most of the answer is us. Dr. Ahmar Zaidi is a pediatric hematologist who focuses on the care of people with sickle cell disease. He works at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan and is involved in research looking at pain in sickle cell disease patients. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Play Video Play Video 03:54 Hour Detroit’s Excellence in Care Award Sharada Sarnaik, M.D., Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologists at Children’s Hospital of Michigan presented Hour Detroit’s Excellence in Care Award Play Video Play Video 07:12 SCDAAMI Questions about Hydroxyurea OUR THEME: Together we can make a difference and "break the sickle cycle" OUR MISSION To maximize the life potential of individuals living with sickle cell disease To enable individuals with sickle cell trait to make informed decisions with respect to family planning. To provide education and testing for the general public Play Video Play Video 10:16 World Sickle Cell Day | American Black Journal Clip Air date: 6/19/16. Three women on the front lines in the battle against sickle cell disease: Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy, who is Board Chair of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America’s Michigan chapter; Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Michigan; and Anastasia Worthy, Youth Ambassador of the Michigan Chapter of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America. Episode 4437/Segment 1. Play Video Play Video 02:00 2018 Access to Care Summit Educating and Empowering Sickle Cell Patients 2018 Access to Care Summit: Educating and Empowering Sickle Cell Patients. Original published link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEHsyeTbYT8&t=9s Play Video Play Video 00:31 Annual SCD Therapeutics Conference Experience Wanda Whitten Shurney, M D Wanda Whitten-Shurney, M.D., the CEO and medical director of SCDAA – Michigan Chapter, explains the value that the annual Sickle Cell Disease Therapeutics Conference offers to the SCD community in this short video. To learn more, visit scdconference.com. Original published link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYP1YkA0W3A Play Video Play Video 05:48 Sickle cell disease: Why is it hard to talk about our pain? BBC Stories Sickle cell disease is a serious and lifelong health condition that predominantly affects people from African or Caribbean backgrounds. Symptoms include bouts of pain, strokes, organ failure, and complications that can result in reduced life expectancy. Some consider it a 'silent illness' as those who have the condition rarely speak about it or the pain that they live with. We speak to 25 year-old Chris who lives with the disease and started his own initiative that aims to create conversation about the condition. Produced by: Kesewaa Browne Filmed and edited by: James Stewart Animation: Gerard Groves Commissioning Editor: Kimberley Rowell #sicklecell #sickle #bbc We are BBC Stories, a group of journalists making films, long and short, with the younger audience (18-24) in mind. The idea is to tackle issues which concern and impact this group of people. So think about anything from race and identity to mental health, money and much more. Play Video Play Video 05:06 Prodigy Talks With Real Health About His Life With Sickle Cell Anemia Hip-Hop Star Prodigy talks with Real Health editor in chief Kate Ferguson about his life with sickle cell anemia. Provider-focused sickle cell videos Play Video Play Video 10:35 Sickle Cell Disease: a battle for equality, justice and respect | Ahmar Zaidi | TEDxDetroit What led a 46 year old Haitian artist to being kicked out of the hospital in the dead of winter? What led him to joblessness and homelessness? Part of the answer was in his blood...but most of the answer is us. Dr. Ahmar Zaidi is a pediatric hematologist who focuses on the care of people with sickle cell disease. He works at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan and is involved in research looking at pain in sickle cell disease patients. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Play Video Play Video 04:23 Burden of Sickle Cell Disease Expert clinicians discuss the prevalence and overall burden of sickle cell disease across the globe and recognize the role of community physicians in managing the disease. Play Video Play Video 01:19 Dr Ahmar Zaidi on Efforts Needed to Address Complications of Sickle Cell Disease Ahmar Zaidi, MD, pediatric hematologist-oncologist, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center, Children's Hospital of Michigan, discusses the need for more efforts from both the medical community and regulators to address the psychosocial complications of sickle cell disease. Play Video Play Video 09:09 Freda Lewis-Hall and TLC's "T-Boz" Discuss Sickle Cell Disease on The Doctors Dr. Freda Lewis-Hall, chief medical officer of Pfizer, appears on The Doctors to speak about sickle cell disease, a blood disorder that primarily affects African Americans, and the genetic trait linked to the disease. She and The Doctors are joined by Tionne "T-Boz" Watkins, of the musical group TLC, who lives with the condition. Check your local listings to see the whole show and learn more at www.GetHealthyStayHealthy.com. Freda Lewis-Hall and TLC's "T-Boz" Discuss Sickle Cell Disease on The Doctors

  • SCDAA-MI E-Newsletters | -scdaami-

    Catch up on news and information from the SCDAA-MI E- newsletters Read the latest news SUBSCRIBE TO OUR E-NEWS September 2020 Special Edition Read web version ​ Download PDF Summer 2020 (August) Read web version ​ Download PDF World Sickle Cell Day Alert Read web version ​ Download PDF Spring 2020 (April) Read web version ​ Download PDF January 2020 (Winter) Read web version ​ Download PDF November 2019 Read web version ​ Download PDF

  • Community Resources | -scdaami-

    community resources Connect to services that can help meet your basic and emergency needs Out-state resources coming soon!​ Click here for an additional list of COVID-19 specific resources. Top Education Mental Health Clothing Internet & Device Access Housing/Shelter Food All Services All Services Food Education ALL SERVICES Locate various community resources by zip code https://navigator.familydoctor.org/ ​ THAW The Heat and Warmth Fund Thaw has funds available throut the Michigan Energy Assistance program. If you or someone you know needs assistance with their utilities click on the link above for more on how to get help. ​ United Way 2-1-1 United Way for Southeast Michigan's 2-1-1 service provides referrals to programs in Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, Monroe and Lapeer counties, connecting users with more than 30,000 service providers throughout the state that can help with food, housing, utilities, medical bills, and more. You can get information online at United Way 2-1-1 , or by dialing 2-1-1 (or 1-800-552-1183 ). ​ FOOD ​ Locate food banks by zip code https://www.feedingamerica.org/find-your-local-foodbank Detroit-area food banks and kitchens Gleaners Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan - 2131 Beaufait St., Detroit, MI 48207, (866) 453-2637 Forgotten Harvest - A lways check location sites and bring a picture ID Yad Ezra Lighthouse Food Pantry City of Detroit Food Pickup Capuchin Soup Kitchen - (313) 579-2700 Redford Interfaith Relief - ( 313) 387.9802 CARES in Farmington Hills - (248) 474-8231 (Call to make an appointment for the food pantry.) ​ HOUSING/SHELTER Wayne County Covenant House (housing, food, basic necessities such as showers, laundry, etc) Detroit Phoenix Center (Housing, Food assistance) ​ Wayne Metro Community Action Agency Detroit Housing Commission ​Detroit Housing Wayne County Department of Health and Human Services ​Wayne (branches listed by zip code) United Community Housing Coalition , (313) 963-3310 Health Emergency Lifeline Program, 1726 Howard St., Detroit, MI 48216, (313) 832-3300 Oakland County The Sanctuary – Common Ground , 1228 S. Washington, Royal Oak, MI 48067, (248) 547-2260 ​ ​ INTERNET & DEVICE ACCESS FCC program for eligible households to provide low cost telephone and broadband internet service (Michigan is a participating state) Some internet providers are offering free services to low-income families and households with students. Free Comcast Xfinity internet: Comcast Xfinity is currently offering its Internet Essentials program free for two months to new customers. The internet provider is also automatically increasing speeds for all Internet Essentials customers. Comcast Xfinity Wi-Fi hotspots are also open and free to use by anyone. Free internet for students from Charter Spectrum: Households with students K–12 or university students can sign up for a new Charter Spectrum internet account to get the first two months of internet with speeds up to 100 Mbps for free. Installation fees will be waived for those who qualify for the offer. Call 1-844-488-8395 to enroll. Spectrum Wi-Fi hotspots are also currently open and free to use. Free internet for students from Altice : Altice internet providers Suddenlink and Optimum are offering 60 days of free internet service for households with K–12 or college students. Internet speeds are up to 30 Mbps if you do not already have access to a home internet plan. To sign up, call 1-866-200-9522 if you live in an area with Optimum internet service, or call 1-888-633-0030 if you live in an area with Suddenlink internet service. AT&T : https://www.att.com/help/covid-19/ CLOTHING ​ ● Salvation Army , Detroit: (313) 897-2914 ● Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries - (313) 366-3409 ● Christ Church of Redford - (313) 534-3436 ● Redford Interfaith Relief - (313) 387-9802 ● CARES in Farmington Hills - (248) 882-7800 ​ ​ ​ MENTAL HEALTH & SUICIDE PREVENTION ​ Michigan Mental Health Networker National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 1 (800) SUICIDE (English) 1 (877) SUICIDA (Spanish) DetoxRehabs.net 24/7 Treatment call 1 (888)859-4403 ​ ​ ​ EDUCATION For FREE COLLEGE click here!!! For those of you who are interested, the Michigan Reconnect is providing free tuition at your in-district community college to earn an associate degree or Pell-eligible skill certificate if you're 25+! ​ ​ Mental Health Housing Internet Clothing Back to the top Back to the top Back to the top SCDAA-MI’s services are available throughout Michigan and span lifetime needs. ​ For more information: Call 313-864-4406 Email info@scdaami.org Contact our nearest satellite office: Adult Clinic Caseworker at DMC: (313) 864-4406 Benton Harbor/Kalamazoo Area: (313) 505-4081 Grand Rapids/Muskegon Area: (616) 426-9259 Jackson/Lansing Area: (800) 842-0973 Saginaw/Flint Area: (989) 372-025 ​

  • Press Releases | -scdaami-

    News media releases and alerts from SCDAA-MI press releases 2019-20 Press Releases ​ September 17, 2020: MEDIA ALERT: SCDAA-MI marks Sickle Cell Awareness Month with walk, ER call-to-action June 12, 2020: SCDAA-MI “Shines the Light” for World Sickle Cell Day, June 19 February 26, 2020: SCDAA-MI Announces SAFE(R) Initiative to Improve Emergency Sickle Cell Care November 20, 2019: Dr. Wanda Shurney Responds to FDA's Approval of Adakveo Top FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 17, 2020 ***MEDIA ALERT*** SCDAA-MI marks Sickle Cell Awareness Month with walk, ER call-to-action Virtual walk participants encouraged to “move how you choose” on Sept. 19 Physician, hospital partners urged to take a stand for SAFER sickle cell care WHAT: The annual Sickle Cell Matters Walk raises consciousness around the most common genetic disorder in the U.S., but this year it happens from wherever participants are. More than just an awareness event, SCDAA-MI’s walk raises funds, promotes the need for additional sickle cell research, and combats medical inequities often faced by sickle cell patients. #SickleCellMatters #SickleCellMattersWalkMI #SickleCellLivesMatter WHO: SCDAA-MI CEO & Medical Director, Wanda Whitten-Shurney, M.D.; Honorary Chair Deborah Smith-Pollard, co-host of “Sunday Morning Inspiration” on MIX 92.3 FM and Professor of English Literature at the University of Michigan-Dearborn; Honorary Co-Chair, Ahmar Zaidi, M.D., a Pediatric Oncologist/Hematologist, in the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic at Children’s Hospital of Michigan, and nationally known SCD advocate known to most as “Dr. Z.” Event sponsors: (Diamond Presenting) Global Blood Therapeutics and Emmaus Life Sciences; (Silver) Novartis, Medunik USA, and Wayne County Community College District; (Copper) Pfizer and Functional Fluidics. WHY: Though medically recognized more than 100 years ago, it was only the introduction of prophylactic penicillin in the 70s and subsequent comprehensive pediatric efforts that now allow most individuals with sickle cell to live far beyond childhood and well into adulthood. However, there are just four disease-modifying treatments available to sickle cell patients, with two of those achieving FDA approval less than a year ago. Most patients, then, resort to emergency department care for sickle cell’s unpredictable, indescribable pain crises. Once there, only about one in four patients receives the standard of care described in current guidelines and many studies have shown that patients do not receive treatment for their pain as soon as, or in appropriate doses as, other patients, according to the U.S. Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. WHEN: Saturday, Sept. 19 WHERE: The virtual Sickle Cell Matters online program premiers at 10 a.m. EST on SCDAA-MI’s YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChFCW2PqipdZiRKcb16Z5Gw ) and Facebook Live @SickleCellMichigan. Interested hospital and physician partners can learn more and partner with SAFER at www.scdaami.org/sicklecell911. MEDIA CONTACT: Stefanie Worth | email: worths@scdaami.org ABOUT SCDAA-MI: Our Mission: To maximize the quality of life of individuals living with sickle cell disease. To enable individuals with sickle cell trait to make informed decisions with respect to family planning. To provide education and testing for the general public. Founded in 1971 by Charles F. Whitten, M.D., the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America – Michigan Chapter, provides education, assistance, and advocacy for individuals living with and families affected by sickle cell disease. Other services include counseling, support groups, referrals for financial assistance and medical care. SCDAA-MI connects students and job seekers with school, college and employment assistance; sends children to summer camp each year, and works to raise public awareness. The agency also serves as the coordinating center for the newborn sickle cell screening program for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. SCDAA-MI’s services are available throughout Michigan and span lifetime needs. For more information, visit www.scdaami.org or call 313-864-4406. ### BACK TO THE TOP 2020 walk SCDAA-MI “Shines the Light” for World Sickle Cell Day, June 19 Supporters are asked to #MaskUp4SickleCell, celebrate community grads, and recognize #SickleSabbath JUNE 12, 2020 PRESS RELEASE PDF ​ CONTACT : Stefanie Worth Sickle Cell Disease is the most prevalent inheritable blood disorder in the country, affecting 70,000 – 100,000 individuals, most of whom are African American. “It’s a blood disease, not a black disease,” says Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney, citing one of the takeaways her agency and other community-based sickle cell organizations want people to learn through this year’s World Sickle Cell Day events. Sickle cell is genetic – not contagious – and most common among people of African descent and those of Latin American and Middle Eastern heritage, but can affect anyone of any race. ​ “We have an entire weekend of activities that include generating awareness, honoring our graduates, and learning during worship,” says Shurney, CEO and Medical Director of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America – Michigan Chapter Inc. “We’re sending our message out into the world to create change on behalf of a group of individuals who were born with a disease that is almost always automatically discriminated against.” Efforts for World Sickle Cell Day, Friday, June 19, aim to enlighten the community-at-large. A social media blitz featuring the hashtags #MaskUpForSickleCell and #BehindTheMask will feature photos of patients, caregivers and allies in red masks telling their stories and sharing key messages: Sickle cell disease affects individuals of all races. It’s a BLOOD disease, not a Black disease. It is in your genes. It is NOT contagious. Individuals with sickle cell disease are not drug addicts, they need pain relief. If both parents have sickle cell trait they can have a child with sickle cell disease. GET TESTED to know for sure. ​ Though medically recognized more than 100 years ago, it was only the introduction of prophylactic penicillin in the 70s and subsequent comprehensive pediatric efforts that now allow most individuals with sickle cell to live far beyond childhood and well into adulthood. To help celebrate their milestones, World Sickle Cell Day continues on Saturday, June 20 with a Virtual Graduation Open House for students finishing high school, trade school or college. On Sunday, June 21, World Sickle Cell Day attention turns to houses of worship varying in size, denomination and membership composition for Sickle Sabbath. This outreach effort focuses on educating people about sickle cell trait, which is carried by approximately 1 in 12 African Americans. SCT is also found among people with ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa; the Western Hemisphere (South America, the Caribbean, and Central America); Saudi Arabia; India; and Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy according to the Centers for Disease Control. “Sickle cell disease starts with sickle cell trait” is the message churches are asked to carry to their congregations along with information about chances of inheritance and challenges of the disease. ​ “This is an impactful time in America and we hope that World Sickle Cell Day can build on the Black Lives Matter movement to create real change in medical settings for people with sickle cell. I’m calling on my colleagues who knelt in solidarity with White Coats For Black Lives to create a movement that makes the emergency rooms and hospitals safe spaces for sickle cell patients,” says Shurney. ​ “The hallmark of sickle cell is excruciating, unpredictable pain that often drives patients to seek care in emergency departments,” Shurney continues. “These are individuals who’ve often lived with pain since childhood and – being good patients – know their bodies and what they need to control their pain, which is typically opioids. Yet they arrive at hospitals seeking relief and are often accused of being there just to get drugs. You would think they’d be treated like a Type 1 diabetic who shows up needing care and knows their proper insulin dosage, but they’re not.” ​ In February, SCDAA-MI launched its SAFE(R) initiative to help counter this reality. SAFE(R) provides medical professionals with quick access to an online portal at SCDAAMI.org/SickleCell911 that provides clinical practice guidelines for sickle cell established by the National Institutes of Health, sickle cell-specific opioid guidance from the CDC, and emergency room triage guidelines from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, as well as best practices and recommendations from the American Society for Hematology and other leading experts in sickle cell treatment. ​ Only about one in four patients with sickle cell disease receives the standard of care described in current guidelines, and many studies have shown that patients do not receive treatment for their pain as soon as, or in appropriate doses as, other patients, according to the U.S. Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. ​ “The world is at a crossroads and so is sickle cell disease. Two new medications were approved by the FDA for treatment at the end of 2019. Yet, patients still face barriers accessing these meds and receiving competent, compassionate medical care,” says Shurney. “Too many providers still don’t know how to properly treat sickle cell patients. Stereotypical biases prevent many individuals from receiving care according to nationally established guidelines – or any care at all. ​ “We have a long way to go to reach health equity where sickle cell is concerned. Now is a great time to start.” BACK TO THE TOP SCDAA-MI ANNOUNCES SAFE(R) INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY SICKLE CELL CARE Effort aims to assist medical community in proper treatment of long-misunderstood disease ​ ​ February 26, 2020 PRESS RELEASE PDF ​ CONTACT : Stefanie Worth ​ Today, the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter launched a new initiative designed to help advance the care and well-being of individuals living with sickle cell disease. The initiative, known as SAFE(R) , provides medical professionals with quick access to an online portal at SCDAAMI.org/SickleCell911 that provides clinical practice guidelines for sickle cell established by the National Institutes of Health, sickle cell-specific opioid guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, as well as best practices and recommendations from the American Society of Hematology and other leading experts in sickle cell treatment. Though medically recognized more than 100 years ago, it was only the introduction of prophylactic penicillin in the 80s and subsequent comprehensive pediatric efforts that now allow most individuals with sickle cell to live far beyond childhood, although their lifespan still falls short of the national average by about 30 years. Yet, while research and treatments for the disease are now gaining more attention, individual’s lives are at stake daily due to a lack of adult medical providers trained in sickle cell’s complexities. In fact, there is a peak in mortality at the time of transition from pediatric to adult care. “For more than 30 years, I’ve had the privilege of serving as pediatrician to Michigan children with sickle cell disease – caring for them and their families, and advocating for their needs. Along with my colleagues across the country, we’ve achieved levels of success in their healthcare that my father only dreamed of when he started SCDAA-MI 49 years ago,” says Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney, CEO and Medical Director. “Now we’ve reached this pivotal point in sickle cell history where research and treatment possibilities are at an all-time high, yet, we are losing far too many patients we’ve brought all this way for the past four decades to a medical system unprepared to receive them.” The emergency room – a frequent stop for our patients – is an extremely perilous place for adults. Individuals out-of-state have often reached out to their former pediatricians at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Sickle Cell Clinic asking them to coach a doctor in charge of their care unfamiliar with the disease. The situation has produced a skepticism among patients that they’ll be adequately cared for, sometimes causing them to take their chances and not go to the ED at all. Central, then, to the SAFE(R) Initiative is the wallet-sized Sickle Cell 911 (SCD911) card, which directs providers to the SAFE(R) site at SCDAAMI.org/SickleCell911 . In addition to guidelines, recommendations and best practices, the medical professional-focused pages also provide educational resources about the disease and its potential complications. Sickle cell patients are advised to carry the SCD911 card with them and present it when they need emergency care – whether at home or away. Patients and caregivers have shared stories about ED providers resorting to the internet or medical journals to find information about treating the disease. The SAFE(R) initiative puts that information at providers’ fingertips in an easily accessible and usable format, hopefully saving crucial acute care time that in turn leads to saving lives. “I’m appealing – no, challenging – my counterparts in adult primary, specialty, and emergency medicine to partner with us in changing this narrative by committing to SAFE(R) treatment. It’s time for a plot twist, so to speak, and we invite you to help re-write the future chapters of the sickle cell story. Patients throughout Michigan are looking for SAFE(R) spaces for care every day. Let us know we can confidently refer them to you and your health systems for this compassionate, equitable, and guideline-based treatment. History will thank you and so will we.” ​ ​ BACK TO THE TOP Dr. Wanda Shurney Responds to FDA's Approval of Adakveo First targeted treatment sparks excitement and hope among doctors and those living with the debilitating condition ​ ​ November 20, 2019 PRESS RELEASE PDF ​ CONTACT : Stefanie Worth Friday, the FDA gave its approval for Adakveo (crizanlizumab-tmca) , the first targeted therapy to treat pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). “This medication is a potential game changer in the quest for better treatment for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD),” said Wanda Whitten-Shurney, M.D., CEO and Medical Director of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter (SCDAAMI). “We are excited that after 109 years, individuals with SCD can finally say there is a medication developed specifically for them. For 20 years our patients had only one disease modifying medication, hydroxyurea. ​ “Unfortunately, because it is a drug used to treat cancer, many physicians are hesitant to prescribe it and many patients are afraid to take it – leaving supportive care such as blood transfusions, antibiotics for infections, and potent narcotics for essential pain relief as their only options,” said Dr. Shurney. First recognized by the medical community in the United States in 1910, SCD is a genetic condition inherited from two parents who carry the gene for sickle cell trait. The hallmark of the disease is episodes of unpredictable and often excruciating pain due to crescent- (sickle) shaped red blood cells that block the flow of blood, and therefore the delivery of oxygen, to vital organs. These red blood cells are also fragile and break down early causing anemia and fatigue. The newly-approved Adakveo targets the episodes of pain frequently referred to as a pain crisis. ​ “We hear story after story from patients in genuine need of significant pain treatment being denied the compassionate and competent care they desperately need and deserve because many in the medical community are unsure, uncomfortable, or unaware of how to best treat sickle cell patients,” said Dr. Shurney. “Patients in crisis are often questioned about the validity of their symptoms and assumed to be ‘drug seeking’.” This problem is exacerbated by the current opioid crisis. ​ In addition to her role at the SCDAAMI – fondly known as the Sickle Cell Center throughout the community – Dr. Shurney has been a familiar face to many families whose children have been patients at the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic at Children’s Hospital of Michigan during her 30-year career providing out-patient care with an emphasis on education and coping strategies. She has worked relentlessly to help kids and their families manage the chronic ailment while enjoying healthier, more active lives. Many of her patients are now adults – something unheard of 30 or 40 years ago. ​ “Thanks to advances like the administration of penicillin to give children with SCD a fighting chance against infection, we’re now seeing many patients living a closer to normal lifespan, but they are still faced with significant challenges,” said Dr. Shurney. “This illness can disrupt every aspect of the family’s life. Children miss school, parents and adults miss work which can result in termination of employment and the resultant financial strain on the family. Frequent trips to the doctor and repeated hospitalization are an additional burden. Many individuals have some level of pain every single day. After 109 years, it is past time to improve life and offer hope to this patient population.” ​ Though numbers are thought to be higher, an estimated 100,000 individuals in the U.S. currently live with some form of the debilitating and life-threatening disease. Comparatively, there are about 30,000 people with cystic fibrosis and 20,000 people (predominantly men) with hemophilia.1 Yet, despite three to five times as many people living with SCD, the disease remains widely unknown, misunderstood, and poorly resourced. ​ “This in the face of the fact that SCD primarily affects people of color - mostly African Americans and Latinos, but also East Indians, Greeks, Italians, individuals from the Middle East, and other people from malaria-afflicted parts of the world,” said Dr. Shurney. The disease is an evolutionary response to malaria: Those with sickle cell trait are less likely to get malaria. But nature’s protective mechanism brought about its own unbearable consequences. ​ “Thanks to the Orphan Drug Act, there are numerous promising clinical trials underway. We are also encouraged by the National Institutes of Health’s Cure Sickle Cell Initiative striving for a genetic cure in the next five to 10 years,” said Dr. Shurney. “The FDA’s approval of Adakveo is a big step in the right direction. Our next challenge is to make sure the medication is accessible to the patients who so desperately need it. Individuals with sickle cell disease are living longer, but we are also focused on improving their quality of life.” 1 Cystic fibrosis and hemophilia statistics courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control at www.cdc.gov ​ ​ 2020 World Sickle Cell Day SAFER launch Adakveo BACK TO THE TOP

  • Our Board | -scdaami-

    Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter ​ Board of Directors Chairperson Kym L. Worthy Prosecutor, Wayne County District ​ Jeffrey Sherbow, Esq, 1st Vice Chair, Attorney, Sherbow Law Office ​ Ms. Cheryl L. Haskett, Treasurer Finance Director & Consultant, YDB, Inc. Kathleen Neumann, Secretary Retired Regional Director, Judson Center ​ Sharada Sarnaik, M.D. , Assistant Secretary Retired Director, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic Children's Hospital of Michigan ​ Sonja L. Banks, CEO, International Dyslexia Association, Inc . Barbara Cushing, M.D. Retired Pediatric Hematologist, CHM LeWanda Gipson Deputy Director, Matrix Human Services ​ Deborah Smith-Pollard, Ph.D. Associate Professor, U of M Dearborn ​ Beverly Watkins Systems Administration, Toyota ​ our board

  • Get Involved Overview | -scdaami-

    get involved Together our tenacity and commitment have greatly brightened the future for sickle cell: comprehensive pediatric care has become a medical standard throughout most of the U.S., allowing patients to pursue college educations, take on dream careers, marry and welcome extended families. At the same time, many challenges remain: awareness among the adult medical community lags behind pediatric expertise at the expense of patient health. Sickle cell still bears the weight of stigma attached to systemic discrimination. While research is on the uptick, treatments are limited. There is no universal cure. ​ Your support matters in our quest for consciousness, equity, and a cure. Please join us today. DONATE The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter thrives on the support of dedicated patients/clients, staff, volunteers, funders, sponsors, donors , and community partners . We've remained committed to our mission of improving the lives of people living with sickle cell disease for 48 years. Give today . ADVOCATE This is an exciting time for the sickle cell community as new treatments have recently become available and interest in research to find a cure has spiked. Yet, insurance hindrances, misplaced opioid restrictions, and ongoing systemic discrimination continue to block access to proper care and threaten the lives of patients. Raise your voice for sickle cell. VOLUNTEER There are always volunteer opportunities at SCDAA-MI for assistance at our annual Sickle Cell Matters Walk, encouraging an increased social media presence, office help, committees, and more. ​ Complete our volunteer form to let us know you're interested, and we'll contact you when opportunities arise.

  • About Us | -scdaami-

    about us The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America - Michigan Chapter has been a leader in the sickle cell community since 1971. We are committed to improving the lives of people with sickle cell by keeping our mission at the center of everything we do. ​ OUR HISTORY SICKLE CELL CENTER Our success all started with the vision of Dr. Charles F. Whitten. His daughter Dr. Wanda Whitten-Shurney continues the work. Read More > OUR IMPACT EVERYBODY COUNTS Numbers, numbers, numbers. But here at SCDAA-MI, every statistic represents a real person we fight for every day. Read More > OUR BOARD LEADERSHIP MATTERS Our board members provide mission and operational oversight with passion, dedication, and expertise. Read More > OUR STAFF 200 YEARS The SCDAA-MI staff brings more than 200 years of experience to its mission of changing the world of sickle cell. Read More >

  • 2018 Gallery | -scdaami-

    2018 event gallery 2020 Photo Gallery 2019 Photo Gallery Awareness Campaign Launch 2018 SICKLE CELLebration Boll Family YMCA Detroit Saturday, September, 22, 2018 June 19th - World Sickle Cell Day! Saturday, June 9th, 2018 #Sicklecellmatters Awareness Walk Palmer Park, Detroit, Michigan Friendship Baptist Church presents The 42nd Annual Cynthia Coles Circle Benefit Luncheon

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